The Crazy Suburban Mom: Whitelines Nibs...

Hobonichi Cousin Planner in my Filofax

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Whitelines Nibs...

I recently won a giveaway from The European Paper Company’s blog for a Whitelines Side Spiral bound A5 Notebook  (White / Squared).  I was doing the paper happy dance because Whitelines is a paper I've wanted to try for a few months.


I'm always out for a new paper to punch holes in and stick in my A5 Filofax.  My current punchable paper is the Classic Clairefontaine Top Staplebound Notepad - 6 x 8.25, Graph Paper Notebook.



It's 90 grams,  very white, very smooth, as wide but shorter then  Filofax brand pages (the pink one).  It takes ink very well and pencil okay.


There are different versions of Whitelines pads, the one I got was this one (in white):




Whitelines Side Spiralbound A5 Notebook (5.8 x 8.25)

From Whitelines most popular series (Wires), the Whitelines Side Spiralbound A5 Notebook is designed to be simple, effective, and durable with matte coated front and back covers. The Wire-O style binding is snag-free and is perfect for the office or on-the-go. The beauty of Whitelines patented paper is the simple concept that dark lines distract and white lines don't! Grab the Whitelines Wire A5 Notebook, head outside, and you'll notice the slightly grey tinted paper also dramatically reduces glare when jotting down your thoughts. Take it back inside, make a photocopy or scan, and you'll notice only your words and drawings show - no lines!
Available in black or white covers, you can also choose either lined or graph paper to keep your writings and sketches organized. With 70 sheets of 80 gsm paper, the Whitelines Side Spiralbound A5 Notebook is a perfect addition to your creative collection of notebooks, pens, and more!
  • Matte Laminated Soft Covers
  • Wire-O Binding
  • 70 sheets, micro-perforated
  • 80 gsm (20 lb)
  • Carbon Neutral Paper
  • Available in Black or White Covers; Ruled or Graph Paper
Whitelines paper is a soft gray with bright white lines, and has more tooth then Clairefontaine paper.



It takes ink almost as well as Clairefontaine and pencil much better.  The little boxes were colored in and shaded with pencil.  The blue ink is fountain pen.  There was no problems on the back with my Lamy fountain pen and Diamine ink.


The grey has a muting effect on colored inks but in a soft, pleasing way.  The colors are not as vibrant but they don't read muddy; just easier on the eyes.    The above picture shows a variety of colors and pens.  The only ones that came through the back were the one's that always come through the back...


The Rotring 1.o which is like a Sharpie and the Pilot Parallel with a 1.5 nib.  The ink's pretty wet on that one.

Comparing colors...


Clairefontaine on the left is the brightest white, Whitelines is in the middle and the Filofax graph inserts on the right read creamier.  

The side bound spiral notebook is micro-perforated (love) and when the sheets come out they are as long as Filofax paper and a bit narrower.


I like using this paper.  It doesn't have the smooth surface of Clairefontaine paper but that works in it's favor.  It takes pencil very well and after you write the squares sort of fade into the background, must be some sort of optical function of the grey and white combination.  

It takes a large variety of inks well and wet or solvent-types inks about as well as similar weight papers.  It blows Filofax paper out of the water if that's important to you...  And even though I use a lot of color and the grey has a muting effect, I liked that too.  

On my Paper Nib Scale, I'm giving Whitelines Paper 85 Nibs out of 100.  

The concept of Whitelines as described from their website is intriguing.
                   Picture comparing drawings on a Whitelines® paper and a ordinary paper


The curve to the far left shows a Whitelines® paper before the notes from a pen; a lot of light colour (the background) and a small amount of white (the supporting lines). With marks from a pen the curve gets a fresh new peak in the dark area without any visual interference.
Whitelines® paper is toned which means that strong light doesn’t gleam in your eyes when it gets reflected in the paper as ordinary paper does.


The conventional paper has a peak in the dark area (the supporting lines) even before your notes. When using a pen the interference between the supporting line and the pen mark is obvious, they compete about your attention in the same visual space.


Whitelines® is the new generation of writing paper. The concept is patented and yet very simple: Since markings from pens are dark they interfere with the traditional dark lines of ordinary paper. On Whitelines® there is no visual interference between the lines and the pen colour. Whitelines® makes your writing and sketches stand out.




1 Comments:

Molossus 4/18/12, 4:08 PM  

Great review! I lost my Whitelines when I went to a family reunion. I miss it!

  © Blog Design by Simply Fabulous Blogger Templates

Back to TOP